Charity that impels us to be sympathetic of others’ weaknesses

When we are filled with charity, we understand that the behavior of others is most often motivated by their desires to do good, even when that is not the reality of their actions. President Thomas S. Monson articulates it well: “I have in mind the charity that impels us to be sympathetic, compassionate, and merciful, not only in times of sickness and affliction and distress but also in times of weakness or error on the part of others.”  When we give a charitable response to someone, rather than an accusatory or defensive one, we inspire and motivate others to open their hearts, and try harder to make things right.  True charity in our everyday encounters with one another leads to everyday miracles.

The Beginning of Better Days by Shari L. Dew and Virginia H. Pearce

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Resisting the impulse to categorize others

I have in mind the charity that manifests itself when we are tolerant of others and lenient toward their actions, the kind of charity that forgives, the kind of charity that is patient.

I have in mind the charity that impels us to be sympathetic, compassionate, and merciful, not only in times of sickness and affliction and distress but also in times of weakness or error on the part of others.

There is a serious need for the charity that gives attention to those who are unnoticed, hope to those who are discouraged, aid to those who are afflicted. True charity is love in action. The need for charity is everywhere….

Charity is having patience with someone who has let us down. It is resisting the impulse to become offended easily. It is accepting weaknesses and shortcomings. It is accepting people as they truly are. It is looking beyond physical appearances to attributes that will not dim through time. It is resisting the impulse to categorize others.

“Charity Never Faileth,” Thomas S. Monson, General Relief Society Meeting, September, 2010

 

Be limited in the estimate of your own virtues

Don’t be limited in your views with regard to your neighbor’s virtue, but beware of self-righteousness, and be limited in the estimate of your own virtues, and not think yourselves more righteous than others; you must enlarge your souls towards each other, if you would do like Jesus….we must bear with each other’s failings, as an indulgent parent bears with the foibles of his children.”

Eliza R. Snow reporting an address given by the Prophet Joseph Smith
“Chapter 37: Charity, the Pure Love of Christ,” Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith, (2007), 423–34