A vortex of the miraculous

…history is saying it is our job to radically and fundamentally change the world….

We are the only generation who has ever wanted to change the world over white wine and Brie. The change, as I understand it, does not have to do with a collection of more data. Spiritual advancement does not mean that we grow more metaphysically complicated. Many people in this room already know the basic principles because we’ve been learning it together for 20 years. The people, my generation of seekers, as I see it, need a psychological shift. It’s like when you stay a student, at some point rehearsal is over. And if you take a good look at your life, I would like to submit to you to ponder this: Look at the stress and some of the challenges that you’ve had in your life over the last two and three years. Is it possible that some of those stresses and challenges were a direct focus on that part of yourself that you know stands between good and great. A focus that you know makes the difference between a life in which “yeah, you know, I’m coping, I’m functioning,” and a fuller actualization of yourself. Is that not true? Is it something that you sort of thought you could get away with by not dealing with it? Now, why is it so important that we have to actualize ourselves more fully? Because whether you call it the authentic self, the divine self, the Christ self, or the Buddha self – I don’t care what we call it – it is a space of quantum possibility. It is a vortex of the miraculous.

Marianne Williamson, talk at the Bodhi Tree Bookstore, December, 2004

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Emphasize those matters that have an eternal consequence

Don’t judge yourself by what you understand of your potential. Trust in the Lord and what He can do with your dedicated heart and willing mind (see D&C 64:34). Order your life more effectively and eliminate trivia, meaningless detail, and activity. They waste the perishable, fixed, and limited resource of time. Choose to emphasize those matters that have an eternal consequence.

Richard G. Scott, “Making the Right Choices” (CES fireside for Young Adults, Jan. 13, 2002)

Seek to be challenged

Seek to be challenged in what you do. Don’t look for a safe haven where you have no risk, for you will not grow or have real satisfaction.
Richard G. Scott, “For Success in Life,” BYU Commencement Address, 14 August 2008

Never dwell on the past or attempt to protect your comfort zone against the inevitable changes required to meet the future advancements that will be needed.
Robert D. Hales, “The Journey of Lifelong Learning.” August 19, 2008, Campus Education Week Devotional